Music Program
 

Saturday, April 27 at 8:00 p.m.

$15 general admission, $12 students/seniors, $10 members

To learn more about the benefits of becoming a member, please click here.

Vandermark / Wooley Duo

Ken Vandermark - tenor/baritone sax, clarinet
Nate Wooley - trumpet

Ken Vandermark & Nate Wooley had been operating in each other's orbits for several years, having worked together with Paul Lytton, Joe Morris, Agusti Fernandez, and Terrie Ex, before putting together their duo project in October 2013 when they toured the United States for the first time. With this unique ensemble, they deal directly with each other's iconoclastic compositional and improvisational vocabularies, and have created a book of original material that takes inspirational cues from the under-appreciated work of John Carter and Bobby Bradford.

Vandermark and Wooley have worked together to create an organic combination of the jazz tradition, free improvisation, and modern composition, and have then placed it into the raw and intimate context of this duo. more info at: kenvandermark.com & natewooley.com

Hallwalls Music Program is made possible through public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, and a generous grant from the Cullen Foundation.

 
 
341 DELAWARE AVE.
BUFFALO, NY 14202
t: 716-854-1694
f: 716-854-1696

 
GALLERY HOURS:
Tues.—Fri. 11-6
Sat. 11-2
Sun. & Mon. closed

IN THE GALLERY
from May. 10, 2019
through Jun. 28, 2019
 

Ashley Smith
Three Fold Form


Inspired by Jungian psychology and mythology, Ashley Smith's process is an alchemical cauldron where personal narratives about womanhood, motherhood, research about art, stories, and myths of the wild woman archetype who represents the instinctive nature of woman are boiled together and transmuted to create abstract sculptural forms and installations that sprout from the wall and grow from the ground.
 

Stephanie Rohlfs
Put One Over


Rohlfs' work springboards from a clean surface appearance and concise formal gestures into a hybridized set of works that make the artist seem part minimalist, part colorist, part humorist. Rohlfs' sculptural gestures are so adroitly specific and contained that each element—a field of color, a drooping form, a slab of shelving—takes on more imminent and emphatic articulation ...