Visual Arts Program
 

Wednesday, May 1 at 7:00 p.m.

FREE

University at Buffalo Department of Art, Office of Inclusive Excellence, and the Genome, Environment and Microbiome Community of Excellence (GEM) present

Bioart in the Public Sphere @ Coalesce: Report from the Residents, v. 3.0

A Discussion with BioArtists Josh Archer, Chris Copeland, Iman Person & virocode (Peter D'Auria and Andrea Mancuso).

With special Coalesce guest and discussant, bioArtist and theorist: Polona Tratnik.

Hear from Spring 2019 artists-in-residence at the Coalesce Center for Biological Art. Each of these artists will present their residency artworks-in-progress and visions, which include scavenged-automotive-machines propelled by petroleum eating microbes, artistic explorations into chemical and microbial membranes and engineered skins, and yogurt cultures designed to devour their own containers. Coalesce, part of the UB Genome, Environment and Microbiome Community of Excellence, is a hybrid studio-laboratory facility located on UB's North Campus dedicated to enabling hands-on creative engagement with the tools and technologies of the life sciences. Each academic year, six to eight artists-in-residence are selected following an international call for proposals.

About Leonardo/ISAST:
This event is part of the world-wide LASER Talks series sponsored by Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (Leonardo/ISAST), a non-profit organization that serves the global network of distinguished scholars, artists, scientists, researchers and thinkers through programs focused on interdisciplinary work, creative output and innovation.

Polona Tratnik, Ph.D., is Dean of Alma Mater Europæa - Institutum Studiorum Humanitatis, Faculty and Research Institute for Humanities, Ljubljana, where she is a Professor and Head of Research as well. She also teaches courses at the Academy of Fine Arts and Design of the University of Ljubljana, at the Faculty of Education of the University of Maribor and at the Faculty for Design of the University of Primorska. She used to be the Head of the Department for Cultural Studies at the Faculty for Humanities of the University of Primorska. In 2012 she was a Fulbright Visiting Scholar, as well as a Guest Professor at the University of California Santa Cruz. She was a Guest Professor also at the Capital Normal University Bejing (China), at the Faculty for Art and Design Helsinki TAIK (Finland), and at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico City). She is president of the Slovenian Society of Aesthetics (since 2011) and an Executive Committee Member of the International Association of Aesthetics. She was a host organizer of the 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Aesthetics in 2018.

She has authored eight monographs and one proceeding as single author, including the Conquest of Body. Biopower with Biotechnology (Springer, 2017), Hacer-vivir más allá del cuerpo y del medio (Mexico City: Herder, 2013), Art and Contemporaneity (Sophia, 2018) and Art as Intervention (Sophia, 2017).

Polona Tratnik is a pioneer bio artist exhibiting worldwide at shows such as Ars Electronica festival and BEAP festival in Perth.

 
 
341 DELAWARE AVE.
BUFFALO, NY 14202
t: 716-854-1694
f: 716-854-1696

 
GALLERY HOURS:
Tues.—Fri. 11-6
Sat. 11-2
Sun. & Mon. closed

IN THE GALLERY
from May. 10, 2019
through Jun. 28, 2019
 

Ashley Smith
Three Fold Form


Inspired by Jungian psychology and mythology, Ashley Smith's process is an alchemical cauldron where personal narratives about womanhood, motherhood, research about art, stories, and myths of the wild woman archetype who represents the instinctive nature of woman are boiled together and transmuted to create abstract sculptural forms and installations that sprout from the wall and grow from the ground.
 

Stephanie Rohlfs
Put One Over


Rohlfs' work springboards from a clean surface appearance and concise formal gestures into a hybridized set of works that make the artist seem part minimalist, part colorist, part humorist. Rohlfs' sculptural gestures are so adroitly specific and contained that each element—a field of color, a drooping form, a slab of shelving—takes on more imminent and emphatic articulation ...