Literature Program
 

Friday, November 22 at 4:00 p.m.

UB Humanities Institute & Hallwalls present

postponed - Scholars@Hallwalls: Christian Flaugh

This week's Scholars@Hallwalls has been postponed until a later date this spring. We apologize for the short notice and for any inconvenience.

 
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Friday, February 7, 2020 at 4:00 p.m.

UB Humanities Institute & Hallwalls present

Scholars@Hallwalls: Victoria W. Wolcott

"Radical Nonviolence, Interracial Utopias, and the Long Civil Rights Movement"

Join us at Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center for our ninth year of Faculty Fellows talks! This lecture series brings current UB humanities research out into the community - with complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres. Free and open to the public.

Historian Victoria Wolcott explores how utopian ideas and practices shaped the long civil rights movement. As early as the 1920s there were significant experiments in interracial communalism at labor colleges, folk schools, and urban and rural cooperatives. By the 1940s members of the Congress of Racial Equality and the Fellowship of Reconciliation living in interracial utopian communities began to actively train activists in radical nonviolence. By living cooperatively and communally activists envisioned a future with full racial equality and economic justice.

 
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Friday, February 28, 2020 at 4:00 p.m.

UB Humanities Institute & Hallwalls present

Scholars@Hallwalls: Neil Coffee

"Armored for the Arena? The Stoics on Social Engagement"

Join us at Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center for our ninth year of Faculty Fellows talks! This lecture series brings current UB humanities research out into the community - with complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres. Free and open to the public.

Modern technology allows us to lead much of our lives remotely, forcing us to consider anew how we socialize and conduct business with others. Surprisingly, the philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome have much to say on this question. In their discussions of the good life, they debated how we should engage with the social world so as to thrive and fulfill our obligations. This lecture focuses on the Stoics, who were famous for advocating a deep commitment to society, but often held positions that allowed for substantial disengagement.

 
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Friday, April 17, 2020 at 4:00 p.m.

UB Humanities Institute & Hallwalls present

Scholars@Hallwalls: Bill Solomon

"Black Humor and the Making of the Counterculture: Race, Madness, and American Literature in the 1960s"

Join us at Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center for our ninth year of Faculty Fellows talks! This lecture series brings current UB humanities research out into the community - with complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres. Free and open to the public.

This lecture addresses the role acts of identification across racial and ethnic lines played in the construction of countercultural subjectivities in the US in the postwar era. The figure of the "white Negro" has long been recognized as a constitutive element of the beat generation's rejection in the 1950s of the status quo. Similarly, dissenting youth in the 60s coalesced into oppositional groups around the idealization of an array of exotic others. My question concerns the relation of the literary phenomenon known as black humor to such primitivist procedures. To what extent did comic writers critique the mystifications structuring the countercultural imaginary?

 
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Friday, May 1, 2020 at 4:00 p.m.

UB Humanities Institute & Hallwalls present

Scholars@Hallwalls: Meredith Conti

"Haunting the Stage: Dark Tourism, Lieux de Mémoire, and the Immortal Death of Abraham Lincoln at Washington D.C.'s Ford's Theatre"

Join us at Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center for our ninth year of Faculty Fellows talks! This lecture series brings current UB humanities research out into the community - with complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres. Free and open to the public.

One of the most popular tourist destinations in Washington, D.C. is a historic crime scene. Ford's Theatre, the location of President Abraham Lincoln's assassination on April 14, 1865, both typifies and complicates Pierre Nora's notion of lieu de mémoire, a site of memory. Simultaneously operating as a history classroom, a patriotic pilgrimage site, and a dark tourism hotspot, Ford's Theatre contains three interactive lieux de mémoire—a cluster of historic buildings, a museum installation, and a working theatre—all of which continuously reconstruct the site's legendary past while keeping time with the ever-evolving present. Drawing upon the work of Nora and Marvin Carlson, as well as performance studies scholarship on dark tourism and living history museums, Meredith Conti considers the many macabre stagings that haunt Ford's Theatre (onstage, in the museum, on the streets outside), including the fateful, interrupted 1865 production of Our American Cousin. As a lieu de mémoire and a multimodal theatre of the macabre, Ford's Theatre's continuous reproductions of Lincoln's death serve to guarantee his immortality.