Literature Program
 

Tuesday, March 19 at 6:00 p.m.

FREE

C.S.1 Curatorial Projects

James Baldwin's AmericaReading & Discussion Program

Six Tuesdays 6:00–7:30pm, March 19–April 30, 2019 (excluding 4/9/19)

Discussions moderated by Heron Simmons-Price.

"As is the inevitable result of things unsaid, we find ourselves until today oppressed with a dangerous and reverberating silence," James Baldwin wrote in the essay "Many Thousands Gone." The essay was part of Baldwin's first, most powerful collection Notes of A Native Son, first published 60 years ago.

Hallwalls Contemporary Art Center and C.S.1 Curatorial Projects is hosting a Reading & Discussion Program on "James Baldwin's America" for six sessions from March 19 to April 30, 2019, on Tuesday evenings from 6:00 to 7:30pm. Canisius College philosophy professor and community activist Heron Simmons-Price will be facilitating this discussion. Read his biography here.

Funded by Humanities New York, this program encourages friends, colleagues, and strangers to "make time for thinking deeply about a single idea from a variety of perspectives, allowing texts to become catalysts for civic engagement, cultural understanding, and personal reflection."

This Reading & Discussion Program grew out of planning around Nick Cave PLENTY: A Citywide Celebration of Buffalo, the vision of the Chicago based artist best known for his Soundsuits "to introduce Buffalo to Buffalo" via collaborative art making. The goal is to have people "sit or dance side by side" and through getting to know one another build relationships across Buffalo's vibrant, yet siloed immigrant communities, both old and new ... continue reading >>

 
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Friday, March 29 at 4:00 p.m.

Charles L. Davis, II

Scholars @ Hallwalls

Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center, a space for experimental art, music, and film located in the heart of downtown Buffalo at Delaware and Tupper, is the perfect setting for the eighth year of the Humanities Institute's Scholars@Hallwalls lecture series. These monthly presentations feature one fellow's research in an engaging lecture with lively follow-up conversation. This year's lineup highlights the interdisciplinary range of humanities research at UB.

Talks are on Friday afternoons at 4 pm and are free and open to the public. Complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres are served. Please join us for any or all of the Scholars@Hallwalls talks!

"The Spatial Allegories of Frank Lloyd Wright's Prairie Style Architecture"

Charles L. Davis, II, Architecture

This presentation examines the racial politics of space that were manifest by Frank Lloyd Wright's vision of a Prairie Style architecture. While the American prairie was spatially defined by the wide-open spaces that inspired the horizontal massing and flowing interior spaces of this style, it was also the site of a dramatic social struggle between white settlers and non-white natives competing for land. Davis argues that Wright's separation of the symbolically 'white' served spaces and the 'non-white' servant spaces of the home constitutes a spatial allegory of the racial competitions that defined life in the Midwest. This reading invites a reassessment of the ways Wright's style represents the central values of American democracy

 
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Friday, April 5 at 7:00 p.m.

FREE

UB English Dept. & Hallwalls present

Christina Milletti & Kim Chinquee

Exhibit X Fiction: Double New Book Launch!

Christina Milletti, Choke Box: a Fem-Noir
& Kim Chinquee, Wetsuit

Reading & Book Signing.
Books On Sale from Talking Leaves.

Christina Milletti's novel Choke Box: a Fem-Noir won the Juniper Prize for Fiction and is forthcoming from University of Massachusetts Press in March 2019. Her first collection of stories, The Religious and Other Fictions, was published by Carnegie Mellon University Press, and her recent stories can be found in journals such as The Iowa Review, Harcourt's Best New American Voices, The Master's Review, The Cincinnati Review, and Denver Quarterly. She is an Associate Professor of English at the University at Buffalo. Her next book is a collection of fiction called Now You See Her.

Kim Chinquee is a regular contributor to Noon, Denver Quarterly, and Conjunctions, and has also published in Ploughshares, The Nation, Storyquarterly, Indiana Review, Fiction, Mississippi Review, and over a hundred other journals and anthologies. She is the author of the collections Oh Baby, Pretty, Pistol, Shot Girls, and Veer and senior editor of New World Writing. She is an Associate Professor of English at Buffalo State College. Wetsuit is her 6th book.

 
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Friday, April 12 at 4:00 p.m.

Mary Nell Trautner

Scholars @ Hallwalls

Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center, a space for experimental art, music, and film located in the heart of downtown Buffalo at Delaware and Tupper, is the perfect setting for the eighth year of the Humanities Institute's Scholars@Hallwalls lecture series. These monthly presentations feature one fellow's research in an engaging lecture with lively follow-up conversation. This year's lineup highlights the interdisciplinary range of humanities research at UB.

Talks are on Friday afternoons at 4 pm and are free and open to the public. Complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres are served. Please join us for any or all of the Scholars@Hallwalls talks!

"Transforming Medical Problems into Legal Problems"

Mary Nell Trautner, Sociology

Why do some medical problems become legal problems and others do not? This project is based on interviews with 100 parents of children who experienced the same kind of birth injury about their decisions whether or not to pursue legal action against their doctor. Trautner examinex three important influences on parents' decision making: state-level political and media culture, online social networking sites, and intimate social support networks. Whether parents frame their child's injury as a legal problem, medical problem, or personal failing can lead to drastically different actions and outcomes for families and children.

 
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Tuesday, April 30 at 6:00 p.m.

FREE

James Baldwin's America - Reading & Discussion Program

March 19 to April 30, 2019 - Six Tuesdays 6:00 to 7:30pm

"As is the inevitable result of things unsaid, we find ourselves until today oppressed with a dangerous and reverberating silence," James Baldwin wrote in the essay "Many Thousands Gone." The essay was part of Baldwin's first, most powerful collection Notes of A Native Son, first published 60 years ago.

Hallwalls Contemporary Art Center and C.S.1 Curatorial Projects is hosting a Reading & Discussion Program on James Baldwin's America for six sessions from March 19 to April 30, 2019, on Tuesday evenings from 6:00 to 7:30pm. Canisius philosophy professor and community activist Heron Simmons-Price will be facilitating this discussion. Read his biography here.

Funded by Humanities New York this program encourages friends, colleagues, and strangers to "make time for thinking deeply about a single idea from a variety of perspectives, allowing texts to become catalysts for civic engagement, cultural understanding, and personal reflection."

This Reading & Discussion Program grew out planning around Nick Cave PLENTY: A Citywide Celebration of Buffalo, the vision of the Chicago based artist best known for his Soundsuits "to introduce Buffalo to Buffalo" via collaborative art making. The goal is to have people "sit or dance side by side" and through getting to know one another build relationships across Buffalo's vibrant, yet siloed immigrant communities, both old and new. Communicating via the arts is a safe and meaningful platform to find and build common ground.

Please email nickcaveplenty@gmail.com to confirm your participation in the series ... continue reading >>

 
TOP

Friday, May 3 at 4:00 p.m.

Dimitri Anastasopoulos

Scholars @ Hallwalls

Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center, a space for experimental art, music, and film located in the heart of downtown Buffalo at Delaware and Tupper, is the perfect setting for the eighth year of the Humanities Institute's Scholars@Hallwalls lecture series. These monthly presentations feature one fellow's research in an engaging lecture with lively follow-up conversation. This year's lineup highlights the interdisciplinary range of humanities research at UB.

Talks are on Friday afternoons at 4 pm and are free and open to the public. Complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres are served. Please join us for any or all of the Scholars@Hallwalls talks!

"Oia: Perils of American Tourist Children in Greece"

Dimitri Anastasopoulos, English

Oia: Perils of American Tourist Children in Greece (a docufiction) incorporates political analysis of the Greek economic and political crises (2008-2018) together with nonfiction travel writing, cultural critique, and a recasting of Plato's Cave. Fictional narrative in Oia also sits in with a range of cultural narratives, political arguments, and social discourses, which have come to dominate the story of Greece in the last decade. While exploring the use of public and private rhetorical formulations on the crises, the novel recasts media and political narratives into the space of fiction in order to contextualize political responses to the crises essentially as dramatic performances cloaking political ends.