Literature Program
 

Saturday, April 27, 2002

$4 general, $3 seniors/students. $2 members

To learn more about the benefits of becoming a member, please click here.

Co-sponsored/co-presented by:
Just Buffalo Literary Center

A SYMPHONY DOWN UNDER

Presented at:
Hallwalls

"This event will be a celebration of music and words, songs of slavery and salvation, hymns, worksongs, blues, gospel, and jazz, woven into, around, and beside a collection of poems and stories by such notable African American writers as Paul Laurence Dunbar, James Weldon Johnson, Gwendolyn B. Bennett and Langston Hughes, as well as original work by Annette Daniels-Taylor. Join Daniels-Taylor (spoken word), Julius Long (guitar), Marlowe Wright (percussion), Max Thein (bass), and Joyce Carolyn (vocals) as they remember the treasured contribution of the African American in the American story which is the link to the past and key to the future." just buffalo's interdisciplinary programs are made possible with a grant from the Special Arts Services program of NYSCA.


Some publications related to this event:
April, 2002 - 2002

 
 
341 DELAWARE AVE.
BUFFALO, NY 14202
t: 716-854-1694
f: 716-854-1696

 
GALLERY HOURS:
Tues.—Fri. 11-6
Sat. 11-2
Sun. & Mon. closed

IN THE GALLERY
from May. 10, 2019
through Jun. 28, 2019
 

Ashley Smith
Three Fold Form


Inspired by Jungian psychology and mythology, Ashley Smith's process is an alchemical cauldron where personal narratives about womanhood, motherhood, research about art, stories, and myths of the wild woman archetype who represents the instinctive nature of woman are boiled together and transmuted to create abstract sculptural forms and installations that sprout from the wall and grow from the ground.
 

Stephanie Rohlfs
Put One Over


Rohlfs' work springboards from a clean surface appearance and concise formal gestures into a hybridized set of works that make the artist seem part minimalist, part colorist, part humorist. Rohlfs' sculptural gestures are so adroitly specific and contained that each element—a field of color, a drooping form, a slab of shelving—takes on more imminent and emphatic articulation ...