Literature Program
 

Friday, March 30, 2007

Co-sponsored/co-presented by:
The University at Buffalo, Department of English

Shelley Jackson

EXHIBIT X

Presented at:
Hallwalls

Shelley Jackson was extracted from the bum leg of a water buffalo in 1963 in the Philippines and grew up complaining in Berkeley, California. She has spent most of her life in used bookstores, smearing unidentified substances on their spines, and is duly obsessed with books: paper, glue, and ink. Since last reading at Hallwalls' old "Black 'n' Blue Theatre" at Tri-Main Center in the inaugural season of Exhibit X on April 8, 2004, she has published Half Life, a 440-page novel about conjoined twins, chosen as one of the Village Voice's favorite books of 2006. Shelley is also the author of the story collection The Melancholy of Anatomy (Anchor, 2002); the acclaimed hypertexts Patchwork Girl (a reworking of the Frankenstein myth), The Doll Games, and My Body; and several illustrated children's books, including The Old Woman & the Wave and Sophia, the Alchemist's Dog. Her stories and essays for grown-ups have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies including Grand Street, Conjunctions, and Paris Review, and she is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize and a Howard Foundation grant. She lives in Brooklyn and teaches at Pratt Institute and the New School. She continues her ongoing project of tattooing a story entitled Skin on volunteers, one word at a time.


Some publications related to this event:
March, 2007 - 2007

 
 
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Ashley Smith
Three Fold Form


Inspired by Jungian psychology and mythology, Ashley Smith's process is an alchemical cauldron where personal narratives about womanhood, motherhood, research about art, stories, and myths of the wild woman archetype who represents the instinctive nature of woman are boiled together and transmuted to create abstract sculptural forms and installations that sprout from the wall and grow from the ground.
 

Stephanie Rohlfs
Put One Over


Rohlfs' work springboards from a clean surface appearance and concise formal gestures into a hybridized set of works that make the artist seem part minimalist, part colorist, part humorist. Rohlfs' sculptural gestures are so adroitly specific and contained that each element—a field of color, a drooping form, a slab of shelving—takes on more imminent and emphatic articulation ...