publications
 
May, 2000



Hallwalls Calendar: May, 2000.

Artists associated with this publication:
Boris Stout, Alan Stout, Larissa Marangoni, Margaret Crane, Jon Winet, Jane Goldberg, Mark Dresser Trio, Mark Dresser, Denman Maroney, Matthias Ziegler, Odean Pope, Jennifer Reeder, Cate Elwes, Maggie Warwick, Jackie Felix, Milton Welser, Bryan Hopkins, Jeff Sherven, Roberley Bell, Joshua Marks, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Lisa Blamonte, Lorena Guillen, Nicholas Isherwood, Jeanne Palmer-Fornarola, Tammy Wetzel, Nicole Crockett, Bernie Roddy, Kelly Spivey, Tech Arts for Girls, Jody Lafond, Anya Lewin, Vincenzo Mistretta, Lara Odell, Cheryl Jackson, Terry Klein, Meg Knowles, Caroline Koebel, Julia Dzwonkoski, Garland Godinho. Stephanie Gray, Chris Borkowski, Tony Conrad, Ghen Dennis, Sarah Snow, Paul Lyon, Borak Refaeli, Vanessa Churchill, Kierin Baldwin, Mike McGrath, Jimmy Rahn, Pete Schirmer, Zlatan Filipovic, Tom Rogers, John Scannel, Bethany Carlson, Sarah Mamet, Ryan Prince, Dan Fuller, Larval, Schleigho, One World Tribe, Birth, Kenneth Anger


Some events connected to this publication:
April 15, 2000 - LARISSA MARANGONI ONE DAY OF DOMESTIC RITUALS
April 15, 2000 - SAFETY
May 5, 2000 - INDIANERLIEDER: IN THE SKY I AM WALKING
May 5, 2000 - NO FRILLS FOUR
May 12, 2000 - LABOR FILM SERIES
May 19, 2000 - ARTISTS AND MODELS AFFAIR XVII: BUFFALO BABYLON



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Ashley Smith
Three Fold Form


Inspired by Jungian psychology and mythology, Ashley Smith's process is an alchemical cauldron where personal narratives about womanhood, motherhood, research about art, stories, and myths of the wild woman archetype who represents the instinctive nature of woman are boiled together and transmuted to create abstract sculptural forms and installations that sprout from the wall and grow from the ground.
 

Stephanie Rohlfs
Put One Over


Rohlfs' work springboards from a clean surface appearance and concise formal gestures into a hybridized set of works that make the artist seem part minimalist, part colorist, part humorist. Rohlfs' sculptural gestures are so adroitly specific and contained that each element—a field of color, a drooping form, a slab of shelving—takes on more imminent and emphatic articulation ...