publications
 
ARTIST RESIDENCY EXCHANGE: WESTERN NEW YORK 1997


Published in 1997
Essays by Eric Gansworth, E. R. Baxter III, Karen vanMeenen, Jeanne Raffer-Beck, Paul Ford

ARTIST RESIDENCY EXCHANGE: WESTERN NEW YORK 1997 Hallwalls Inc, Buffalo, NY, 1997. [A twenty page black and white booklet with an uncredited introduction, essays by Eric Gansworth, E. R. Baxter III, Karen vanMeenen, Jeanne Raffer-Beck, Paul Ford, photographs of the resident visual artists' work and excerpts from the resident writers' work, and a correspondence between Peter Anson and Jane Huber on the work of Becky McLaughlin. The Artist Residency Exchange was administered by Genesee Valley Council on the Arts, Hallwalls Contemporary Art Center, Niagara Council on the Arts, Pyramid Arts Center, Wayne County Council for the Arts. The booklet was designed by Leslie Wolff of Spencer Graphics.]

Artists associated with this publication:
Charles Agel, Ann Curran, Nicole Kowalski, Arthur Brett Reif, Kathleen Sherin, Alfonso Volo, Brenda J. Cowe, Sarah Freligh, Becky McLaughlin


Some events connected to this publication:
January 24, 1998 - THE 1998 ARTIST RESIDENCY EXCHANGE: WNY EXHIBITION



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Ashley Smith
Three Fold Form


Inspired by Jungian psychology and mythology, Ashley Smith's process is an alchemical cauldron where personal narratives about womanhood, motherhood, research about art, stories, and myths of the wild woman archetype who represents the instinctive nature of woman are boiled together and transmuted to create abstract sculptural forms and installations that sprout from the wall and grow from the ground.
 

Stephanie Rohlfs
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Rohlfs' work springboards from a clean surface appearance and concise formal gestures into a hybridized set of works that make the artist seem part minimalist, part colorist, part humorist. Rohlfs' sculptural gestures are so adroitly specific and contained that each element—a field of color, a drooping form, a slab of shelving—takes on more imminent and emphatic articulation ...